Writing

Pitchapalooza BookCon 2019

Dumbledore once explained to us that you have a choice when it comes to being placed into a Hogwarts house. I know many people would love to be placed in Gryffindor. I have said this before and I will say it again: Pottermore sorted me into Ravenclaw and I fully accepted that I was not brave enough to be in Gryffindor. Seriously, if the Basilisk was slithering towards me I would probably be shielding my crying eyes and calling on someone from Gryffindor to fight the snake for me. Not even kidding.

However, I’m happy to report that I sometimes have my courageous moments and I displayed some serious Gryffindor vibes over this past weekend at a Bookcon Panel called “Pitchapalooza”. That being said, it was the most terrifying feeling ever. It must be exhausting being a Gryffindor. You guys are welcome to join me in the Ravenclaw library for some meditative reading sessions when you need a break from all that valiant stuff you do.

Pitchapalooza 2019:

I was not planning on attending day two of Bookcon, but I had so much fun on day one that I decided to go. That morning, I looked through the list of panels I could attend and came across one called “Pitchapalooza” and the description is what caught my eye.

62243998_313653089556739_7506446387693748224_n

Literary agent Arielle Eckstut and bestselling author David Henry Sterry, known as the Book Doctors, were set to host this panel. Joining them on the judging panel was author Cheryl Willis Hudson. The basic premise of this panel was to give a one-minute pitch of the book you were writing to the panel of publishing experts. They would then critique your pitch in a kind and gentle way and the winner would be introduced to a literary agent or publisher. Twenty participants would be selected at random to pitch their books from everyone who signed up before the panel began. It sounded equally wonderful and terrifying.

Let’s get real for a moment: I hate public speaking. I like to melt into a crowd rather than be placed in front of one. So when I was looking at the bowl containing names for the draw, I heard a voice in my head listing all the reasons why this was a bad idea:

  • My book was far from complete
  • I had not prepared for this in any way
  • What in the world was a book pitch?

I stood there with my name scribbled on the piece of paper that I was clutching for dear life and started listing the reasons why I should do it:

  • What were the odds my name would be picked from the draw?
  • I had my notebook in my bag, which contained a brief summary of my book. It was far from perfect, but it was something if I was chosen as tribute. 
  • I was visiting the concrete jungle where dreams are made of, and according to Alicia Keys and Jay Z, there is nothing I can’t do (let’s hear it for New York!)

I stuffed my name at the very bottom of the bowl and headed towards the panel. I did feel proud of myself for putting my name in the draw but I was also realizing that if I got chosen this would be the first time anyone other than myself would be hearing the story I was writing.

61837950_2294694940745275_774241462253518848_n

I sat down with my journal and flipped through the pages of character profiles and scenes until I found the brief one page summary of my book I had written a month ago. It was well written but I knew it did not have the structure of a book pitch. At best I would be given advice on how to improve my book pitch and my story. I sat there with my stomach in knots and kept telling myself I would not be called.

I was the third person to be called on stage to present my book pitch
*Cue the Hunger Games music*
*Cue the Game of Thrones Battle music*
*Call an ambulance and send me back to Canada* 

You know in the movies how some scenes become super dramatic in slow motion? Well that is the only way I could describe the few seconds after I was called on stage. Everything was a blur and my legs went numb. I suddenly wished my parents or my friends were there with me, but in that moment the kind lady sitting next to me gave me a nudge to get up and told me I would do great. I walked up to the stage on shaking legs and stood behind the podium. Looking out at the crowd I saw nothing but smiling faces. It did not occur to me in that moment that the room was filled with fellow aspiring writers. They understood how scary it was to stand behind the podium and maybe it was their energy that made me take a deep breath and started reading. 

61776968_310393546568062_3059540637868097536_n

It was over before I knew it and I was so relieved once I heard the applause from the crowd. I did it! It was a proud moment and I was curious as to what feedback the judges would give me. I was ecstatic that Arielle was intrigued by the premise of my story and took mental notes on all the advice they gave me on how to improve my book pitch. They were so kind and honest that I felt motivated to keep working on my story.

I knew I did not win but I still walked back to my seat feeling like I had just won the House Cup for Gryffindor. Getting up there on that podium and sharing my story was my personal win.

Writing can be a lonely activity, especially when you never share your words with anyone. I was always terrified of sharing my stories with people. A part of me thought that if I shared my stories I would be exposed as a fraud who had absolutely no talent. It took me a long time to realize that I have always been a writer, and no form of validation from others would change that. So I started sharing bits and pieces of my previous work with a few friends and my parents. Their praise and supportive words are locked away in my heart forever. This was the first time I shared my new story with anyone and the first time I shared my writing with complete strangers. I felt vulnerable and terrified but I survived and came out of it feeling lighter. That is what happens when you release the words you have hiding within yourself for far too long. 

61712952_371108077082383_650880956311273472_n

I was grateful not only to have been given the chance to present my book pitch but also to listen to those of the other nineteen writers. It was incredible hearing such creative stories and I found myself hoping these writers would be published soon. I really want to read their books. The Book Doctors gave so much helpful advice that you could hear the sound of notes being scribbled onto paper throughout the room. I left the panel feeling inspired and full of hope.

So I guess the moral of this story is that we all have some Gryffindor traits in us and all we have to do is take that first step towards something outside of our comfort zone. That is where all the wizardry magic happens.

Keep on writing!
Shazia.                                      

 

4 thoughts on “Pitchapalooza BookCon 2019

    1. Awww thanks so much Kristina! It was the scariest thing I have ever done in my life but completely worth it in the end. Lets hope I can finish this book now haha

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s